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Tuesday, August 28, 2007

Barbadians don't like to speak their minds.Bajans are generally a very timid people.Oftentimes they tend to hide and say things because of the fear of victimization.Recently and I suspect for political reasons they have been an upsurge in weblogs,which although in existence for many years have proved an outlet in recent times for people who want to get their opinions across.

I too have been tending to use weblogs a lot more frequently now. In the early days I did host my own weblog using a software program called geeklog but now I much prefer to have it hosted by Google.With their frequent updates and improvements they are the obvious choice,not mentioning the price of course.

Which brings me to my point which is not a political point but just an observation and maybe just and opinion.I have not been happy with how the rescue operation in Brittons Hill has been done.Barbados as we are aware is a small country with not a lot of resources and certainly not a lot of experience in many areas.Certainly we have no experience in search and rescue operations.

When tragedies happen on a small island you feel very close to it.Sometimes you feel like it could be happening to you or a member of your family.When situations happen you want to feel confident that everyone will be working feverishly to make sure that every option is tried quickly and consistently under sure and confident leadership so that when it is all over your mind can be at rest knowing that every possible thing was done to help you.

Here is what I have been thinking

  • We should have made a quick analysis and sent for the correct rescue personnel from the start or maybe not even make an analysis since it would be obvious that we had no experience.
  • Time would be of the utmost importance since we would be trying to save lives

Here is what I don't understand

Why not treat it as a recovery from the start if treating it like a rescue means that you have to wait to establish whether the trapped persons were alive or not before proceeding.

I would really like to understand what went on because the truth is I don't really know, but that doesn't stop me from feeling unhappy about it.

Letting go is difficult in mine cave-ins: "Making the call to end a rescue, or to transform a rescue into a recovery, takes a skill set that is as yet undefined, say the people who specialize in saving the lost. 'There's no hard and fast science to that. Every case-by-case instance has to be determined,' said Dave Pichotta, a deputy sheriff in San Bernardino, Calif., who heads up the search and rescue teams that fetch tourists and adventurers from caves and mountainsides. Mr. Pichotta's group never officially calls off a search."

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