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Showing posts from March, 2011

In Barbados, the cutter is the perfect on-the-go snack

The Boston Globe: "BRIDGETOWN, Barbados — Some say cutter is short for “cut your hunger.’’ Others think it’s a cutter because you “cut ’er’’ — cut the bun in half and stuff it with good things. Everyone has an opinion because this little sandwich is everywhere on the island.
Barbadians, also called Bajans, enjoy debating the fine points of their local lore. And in this instance, New Englanders may feel right at home here. Many locals pronounce the word “cuttah.’’
A basic Barbados cutter consists of a salt bread bun sliced and filled with cheese, flying fish (caught off the coast here), pork, or, most often, ham. The cushy white yeast bread is baked fresh or sold in stores. Though most Bajan baked goods are sweet, a legacy of the island’s sugar industry days, this one is not. Lettuce and tomato often garnish a cutter; also required is the national hot sauce — either a spicy red version or a mustard-base golden sauce whose active ingredient is Scotch bonnet pepper. A cutte…

Barbados airfare deal  from American Airlines

Image of a Barbados hero or racist tyrant? ajc.com: "Travelers can fly to Bridgetown, Barbados at a base round-trip rate of $298 on trips finished on or before Feb. 15, 2012.

There are not many rules to follow other than giving at least a three day advance notice of travel. Trips are permitted seven days a week, based on sale seat availability. Travelers must stay at least any two nights. There is no maximum stay limit.

There are some year-end blackout dates to avoid: Dec. 15-24, 26-30 on southbound flights and Dec. 26-31 and Jan. 1-8 northbound.

Total ticket rates are $485.10, inclusive of all taxes, fees and surcharges. Round-trip rates during the high season (June-Sept.) to Barbados are typically $705.10!"
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In Barbados, the rum needs no umbrella

Times Colonist
We're in the old stone tasting room at historic St. Nicholas Abbey on Barbados, surrounded by copper-pot stills and oak barrels and the nose-ticklingly spicy aroma of the aged rum in our glasses.

Outside, the warm Caribbean breeze rustles through acres of sugar cane that one day will end up in a glass just like this. Because what we're tasting today isn't just a luscious award-winning rum, but the distillation of 350 years of Caribbean tradition and, if all goes according to plan, the spirit of the islands' future.